Second Opinion: From one Allergy to Another

Not to toot my own horn, but when it comes to food allergies my maternal instinct has helped save Penny from many anaphylactic reactions. Case in point when she was around one my husband insisted that I give Penny Peanut Butter since it’s a good source of protein, plus we loved eating it. However, something in my head kept telling me not to. I kept telling him, “Honey, what if she’s allergic to it?” and he always replied, “Nobody in our family is allergic to peanuts, why would she be the exception?” Well, let’s say I was pretty head-strong with this and never gave in.  Penny turned one and we discovered her dairy allergy. It was then that I insisted to the Doctor to do an Allergy blood test panel to see if she had any other allergies. Guess what? I was right!

Since then we go to yearly allergy visits that consist of blood work, visiting the allergist and, maybe, depending on the result a skin test. Penny’s allergies have been consistently getting higher each year, so this year her allergist decided only to test her peanut allergy. But something inside me was restless, I was not convinced. I wanted Penny to be tested for other allergens because lately she’s had random reactions and we haven’t been able to figure out what is actually causing them.  Long story short, we got a referral from her pediatrician for a second opinion.

Unfortunately, for her first appointment with her new allergist I couldn’t miss work, luckily enough, my husband was on vacation so he took her in. He told me that, since her medical records didn’t make it to the new doctor, the Dr. was, at first, a bit incredulous. To be honest I can’t blame him. I sent my husband to that appointment with 2 pages worth of information on what had been happening for the past year. Well, the allergist did some blood work right then and there and discovered that her allergies were severe. After that, he did a skin test to see why she is having these random allergic reactions and sent her to the lab to get more blood work done.

On the skin test, he tested for peanut, dairy, wheat/gluten, eggs, dust mites, pollen, mold, and pet dander. There were good news and bad news… The bad, her peanut allergy is still severe, and she turned out to be almost equally allergic to dog dander. I have been reading about service dogs that are able to detect allergens in most any forms: raw, cooked, oil, butter, dust, etc.  We have been planning, for the past year to adopt a dog and train it to detect Penny’s allergens. The thought of it gave me peace of mind, but I guess, that is not happening anytime soon. At least we found out before adopting the dog. The good, her dairy allergy has decreased significantly, to the point that the doctor is comfortable enough to do a dairy challenge.

When my husband told me about the dairy challenge I got mixed feelings. I mean, I am super excited that my little one might be outgrowing one of her allergies, but on the other hand, I get anxious when I think about the possibility of her failing that challenge. What if she goes into anaphylaxis? We’ve been through anaphylaxis once, but it was caused by skin contact. I have never seen her have an anaphylactic reaction by ingestion. Then, I tell myself, what if she actually passes the challenge? This means that she will be able to expand her diet. Mentioning the words birthday parties, potlucks, social gatherings, and Halloween would not have to send me into full blown panic and we will be able to go out and eat with a bit more peace of mind. The peanut allergy is still scary but, in my opinion, easier to avoid or manage.

Allergies take you on a roller coaster of emotions. Sometimes you are sad because your child can’t eat or do certain things, other times you panic (especially when you or your child is having a reaction), you can also get happy that you child can’t eat certain things (we eat healthier; we rarely eat processed foods), but overall I am grateful to be able to know what Penny is allergic to and that there is a medication that can save my child’s life in an event of a severe reaction. Life is good!

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